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Jarvis: an Amazon Echo clone in your browser with PageNodes

Virtual assistants are all the rage and the big tech companies all have them now. Siri, Google, Cortana, and of course Alexa on the Amazon Echo. Having a verbal conversation with your computer is the future! Amazon recently put together a tutorial on building an Echo clone with a Raspberry Pi, a mic, and speakers. It's a great way to get started building the bridge from Star Trek in your living room. Modern web browsers also have built in voice capabilities. Let's explore what we can do with those. WebSpeech API The WebSpeech API provides SpeechSynthesis and SpeechRecongintion objects to ...

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WebUSB and JavaScript Robotics

One of the fun tasks in building a Web-based IoT Platform is figuring out ways to connect browsers directly to hardware. Our first iteration of this concept was through the use of a chrome browser extension which lead to the creation of our Chromebots app. This extension uses chrome's serial API to talk to arduinos and utilizes the johnny-five library. This has been a great way to get started with JavaScript robotics and works anywhere Chrome does, including Chromebooks. Until we get an implemetation of Web Serial, a chrome extension is still the way to go for this. So what ...

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Progressive Web Apps and the IoT

In recent years, new web standards and APIs have allowed for the creation of Progressive Web Apps, a combination of the best features of native applications and browser-based apps. At the same time, new networking protocols and the rise of inexpensive hardware platforms have created an Internet of Things that we can actually use today. Introducing PageNodes For us at Iced Dev, the next logical step was to combine these two concepts. And since we pride ourselves on building applications for the open web, we are pleased to present PageNodes, an open source, offline, decentralized, and easy to use framework ...

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Our Latest Creation - Git Splainin

Git-Splainin is a simple Chrome Extension that helps you populate pull requests with a predefined template. If you don't already use a pull request template, I highly recommend taking a moment to read Pull Request Templates Make Code Review Easier by Justin Abrahms. If you don't care about all the cool details and just want to install the extension and use it you can grab it here Automating Pull Request Templates At Iced Dev, we recently started using a template for all of our pull requests. When initially rolling this out, we realized that we might need to make frequent ...

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